Archive for the ‘Consumer Product Safety Commission’ Category

Two Deaths Reported with Ace Bayou Bean Bag Chairs; Recall Announced Due to Suffocation and Choking Hazards

Consumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Recall date: August 22, 2014, Recall number: 14-261

Description

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Ace Bayou Corp., of New Orleans, La., are announcing the voluntary recall of about 2.2 million bean bag chairs following the deaths of two children.

The zippers on the bean bag chairs can be opened and children can then crawl inside, get trapped and suffocate or choke on the bean bag chair’s foam beads. The voluntary standard requires non-refillable bean bag chairs to have closed and permanently disabled zippers.

A 13-year old boy from McKinney, Texas died and a 3-year-old girl from Lexington, Ky. died after suffocating from lack of air and inhaling the chair’s foam beads. Both children were found inside the chairs.

The recalled bean bag chairs have two zippers that can be unzipped and opened, including one of the exterior cover and other directly underneath that zipper.  The recalled chairs with zippers that open were sold in a variety of sizes, shapes, colors and fabrics. They include round or L-shaped, vinyl or fabric, and are filled with polystyrene foam beads. They were sold in a variety of colors, including purple, violet, blue, red, pink, yellow, Kelly green, black, port, navy, lime, royal blue, turquoise, tangerine and multi-color.  The round bean bag chairs were sold in three sizes, 30, 32 and 40 inches in diameter. The L-shaped bean bag chair measures 18 inches wide by 30 inches deep by 30 inches high. “ACE BAYOU CORP” is printed on a tag sewn into the bean bag chair’s cover seam. They were made in China.

The recalled bean bag chairs were sold at Bon-Ton, Meijer, Pamida, School Specialty, Wayfair and Walmart stores and online at Amazon.com, Meijer.com and Walmart.com before July 2013 for between $30 and $100.

Consumers should check their bean bag chairs for any zippers that can open, take those that can open away from children immediately and contact Ace Bayou for a free repair kit to permanently disable the zippers so that they cannot be opened.

VIZIO Recalls to Repair 39- and 42-Inch E-Series Flat Panel Televisions Due to Risk of Tip Over | CPSC.gov

Safety Warning

Click screen for list of models

Recall Details

Units — About 245,000

Sold at:  Best Buy, Meijer, Target, Walmart and other retail stores nationwide , online at Amazon.com, Costco.com, Meijer.com, Sams.com and other internet retailers from December 2013 through June 2014 for between $370 and $450.

Description

This recall involves Vizio E-series 39- and 42-inch Full-Array LED flat panel televisions. The flat panel televisions are black with “VIZIO” printed in the lower right corner of the television front and the VIZIO logo in the center of the back.

Incidents/Injuries

VIZIO has received 51 reports of the recalled televisions tipping over. No injuries have been reported.

Remedy

Consumers using the stand assembly should immediately detach the stand, place the television in a safe location and contact VIZIO for a replacement stand assembly. Consumers with wall-mounted televisions should request the replacement stand assembly in case the stand is needed for future use.

‘It’s shiny, it’s round’ — and it can kill your child: Guard against accidental poisoning

CONSUMER FORUM

By Russ Van Arsdale, executive director Northeast CONTACT
Posted July 06, 2014, at 10:15 a.m.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that nine of every 10 accidental poisonings of children happen in the home. The CPSC also says those cases involve more than our medicine and kitchen cabinets.

Safety experts urge that we “go beyond the bottle” and look all through our homes for possible dangers. They say we need to look at things through a child’s eyes and seek out anything that might be appealing to a youngster.

“It’s shiny, it’s round, and children can’t tell the difference,” says Dr. Karen Simone, director of the Northern New England Poison Center (NNEPC). Simone says tens of thousands of children who think they are eating candy have to be treated for accidental poisonings every year.

She says most of us think of household cleaners and insecticides as the major problems. However, she says children can grab common products such as toothpaste and deodorants, if they’re not kept out of reach; these products can also cause health problems when ingested.

NNEPC compiles statistics on accidental exposures to harmful things. Accompanying the stats is a reminder that numbers of exposures do not equal numbers of patients treated for those exposures; because little hands and mouths are attracted to all kinds of things, multiple exposures are all too common.

From 2011 to 2013, the center recorded 40,080 exposures in youngsters up to age 5. More than 6,000 of those exposures involved cosmetics or other personal care products. The next leading causes of problems were analgesics — mainly ibuprofen and acetaminophen — in what Dr. Simone describes as “therapeutic misadventures.”

Some of those accidents relate directly to our busy lifestyles. Adults hurrying through their morning routines may set out medication on the kitchen table; while their backs are turned, “a small child will scoop it up before they take it.”

Another issue involves adults putting chemicals of various kinds into food or drink containers for storage. Toddlers who don’t yet read act based on what they see; if they see something that looks like food or drink, they may ingest it faster than an adult can react.

Then there’s the matter of many Mainers’ addiction to opioids. An increasing number of take-home medications pose increased risks to children.

“We need to treat the people, but we have to look at the whole picture,” Simone says, urging more awareness by treatment professionals and patients alike.

A final caution involves caregiver errors. More and more women are working, and men are handling more household duties; Simone says this “has led to some confusion” in administering medications. Communication is the key to keeping consumers safe.

Call NNEPC at 800-222-1222 if you suspect there has been an accidental poisoning. You may also call just to ask a question. Simone urges people not to be embarrassed to call, and says they may call anonymously if they like.

For more information, visit www.nnepc.org.

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer 04412, visithttp://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

Coleman Recalls Northstar Lanterns Due to Fire Hazard | CPSC.gov

Units About 95

Recall Summary

Name of product: Northstar® Liquid Fuel Lanterns

Hazard:
An incorrect gas feed tube was installed on the lantern. When lit, the tube can release too much fuel, posing fire and burn hazards.

Description
This recall involves Northstar® liquid fuel lanterns with model number 2000B750 and date codes 10 13 or 11 13. The model number is printed on the base of the lantern, under the lighting instructions. The date code is stamped on the underside of the lantern. A Coleman logo sticker is affixed to the front of the lantern base. The green lanterns measure about 13” tall by 7” wide by 7” deep.

Incidents/Injuries
The firm has received two reports of lanterns catching fire when fuel unexpectedly leaked from the bottom of the unit. No injuries have been reported.

Remedy
Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled lanterns and contact The Coleman Company, Inc. for a replacement lantern.

Sold at
Sporting goods stores nationwide and online at coleman.com from November 2013 through February 2014 for about $125.

Manufacturer
The Coleman Company, Inc. of Wichita, Kan.

Manufactured in USA

 

Wal-Mart Recalls Dolls Due to Burn Hazard | CPSC.gov

Hazard: The circuit board in the chest of the doll can overheat, causing the surface of the doll to get hot, posing a burn hazard to the consumer.

About 174,000

Description

The My Sweet Love / My Sweet Baby electronic baby doll comes in pink floral clothing and matching knit hat. The 16 inch doll is packaged with a toy medical check-up kit including a stethoscope, feeding spoon, thermometer and syringe. The doll’s electronics cause her to babble when she gets “sick,” her cheeks turn red and she starts coughing. Using the medical kit pieces cause the symptoms to stop. “My Sweet Baby” is printed on the front of the clear plastic and cardboard packaging. The doll is identified by UPC 6-04576-16800-5 and a date code which begins with WM. The date code is printed on the stuffed article label sewn into the bottom of the doll.

Incidents/Injuries

Wal-Mart has received 12 reports of incidents, including two reports of burns or blisters to the thumb.

Remedy

Consumers should immediately take the dolls from children, remove the batteries and return the doll to any Walmart store for a full refund.

Sold exclusively at

Walmart stores nationwide from August 2012 through March 2014 for $20.

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Be wary of charity scams in wake of Typhoon Haiyan

CONSUMER FORUM

By Russ Van Arsdale, Executive Director, Northeast CONTACT
Posted Nov. 17, 2013, at 9:59 a.m.

‘Tis the season to be scammed by bogus relief organizations. Okay, it doesn’t rhyme or even roll off the tongue, but it’s a warning some of us won’t heed before parting with some cash.

Typhoon Haiyan appears to be the most powerful storm ever to reach land. It battered the Philippines with winds of more than 200 miles per hour, killing thousands. Relief efforts were launched from around the world, as were scams laced with emotional appeals that their “charity” was the one deserving of your donation.

“Super Typhoon Haiyan Disaster Relief” tops the list of hot topics at the website of Charity Navigator ( www.charitynavigator.org). The organization reports on the ways many charities perform, how much of their fund-raising goes to the good works they purport to support, and even points out low-performing charities with highly paid executives. Charity Navigator lists 22 organizations that are putting donations where they’re needed to help the people of the Philippines. Charity Watch and Guidestar are similar sources of information.

Not every relief group allows donors to designate exactly where their contributions go. Some put all dollars into a general fund, and some set aside leftover donations for relief work in future disasters. If you want to donate only for typhoon relief, make sure the charity you select allows you to make that stipulation.

The outright scammers will be long on promises and vague on details. If you receive a call or solicitation by email or regular mail, watch out for these signs of a scam:

— The group is unknown or recently created, but has a name that sounds like a legit charity.

— People who reach out to you online claim to be victims; unless you know them personally, steer clear.

— Watch out for offers of prizes; real charities don’t try to bribe you with sweepstakes winnings or other freebies.

— Don’t send cash — there’s no guarantee it will get to its destination, and you’ll have no record of the donation for tax purposes.

— Never give out personal or financial information, including your bank account and credit card number, unless you are certain the charity is legitimate.

If you get a call seeking a donation, ask if the caller is a paid fundraiser, who the person works for and whether that firm is licensed to do business in Maine. Then ask what percentage of the funds raised goes to actual charity work. If you don’t like the answers to your questions, consider donating to another organization.

If you use social media, don’t give blindly to a group that posts emotional appeals. You still need to do your homework to make sure your charitable giving does what you want it to. Different charities work in different ways; your research can help assure that your giving goes to the needy, not the greedy.

If you plan to give online, look up your intended charity’s website. The FBI reported that 4,000 fake websites popped up after Hurricane Katrina. And don’t feel pressured by a telemarketer to make a donation. It’s your phone, and you can hang up at any time.

This newspaper wrote Friday of ways to donate through your church.

Today’s column focused on disaster relief giving, but the principles apply to all charitable donations. At this season of sharing, scammers are hard at work; don’t give them a cent.

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer 04412, visit http://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

 

CPSC – L.L.Bean Recalls Boat Carts for Canoes and Kayaks

CPSC – L.L.Bean Recalls Boat Carts for Canoes and Kayaks; Plastic Wheel Rims Can Burst and Injure Users.

Recall Details: About 2,200 Units

Description:
This recall involves L.L.Bean’s Deluxe Packaway Boat Carts used to haul canoes and kayaks into or out of the water by hand. The carts have a white and blue aluminum frame with rubber tires and have two black nylon straps marked L.L.Bean. The carts weigh about seven pounds. 

Incidents/Injuries:
L.L.Bean has received two reports of the plastic wheel rims on the cart bursting, resulting in bruises to a consumer who was struck by broken, flying pieces.  No injuries were reported in the second incident.

 

Remedy:
Consumers should call L.L.Bean or go to the firm’s website for new instructions and psi stickers to put on the wheels of the cart.  Do not add air to the tires until reviewing the new instructions on the maximum inflation level or psi.

Sold exclusively at L.L.Bean stores nationwide, L.L.Bean’s catalog and online at www.llbean.com from March 2012 through June 2013 for about $100.

 

 

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