How to keep track of latest scam tactics

CONSUMER FORUM

Posted Aug. 09, 2015, at 1:32 p.m.

At some point, you’ve likely received an email from someone you know who claimed to be trapped in a foreign country and needed you to wire money immediately.

If your scam-sensing radar was well tuned, you deleted that message without another thought. However, a friend or relative may not be so aware of the ways of scam artists. That friend or relative could benefit from the Federal Trade Commission, or FTC, series of scam alerts.

These periodic messages cut to the chase with language similar to this: “Government agencies will never ask you to pay by wiring money. Neither will legitimate businesses. If someone insists you pay by wiring money, it’s a scam. Don’t do it.”

That alert was issued last Wednesday on the FTC’s website, ftc.gov. The gold-colored button on the homepage takes you to a series of alerts on all sorts of things every informed consumer should know.

Another recent scam alert was headlined “It’s not the FTC calling about the OPM breach.” There was widespread news coverage of the data breach at the federal Office of Personnel Management, which left more than 21 million current and former federal employees wondering whether their identity was at risk. Scammers use that coverage and those fears to give credibility to their fake phone calls, saying the FTC is offering money to breach victims if they’ll just give up some personal information.

A couple of facts are worth noting here. The FTC does not call to ask for personal data, and the agency does not hand out money, either. It will accept your written or phoned complaint about such hoaxes; that reporting could help investigators put a stop to at least some of the impostor scams and other phishing attempts that put millions of citizens’ identities at risk.

Scam alerts also have dealt with people who pose as friends in an effort to separate you from your money. They may create phony online identities using stolen pictures and profess their love; it’s not long until they’re hitting up their victims for “loans” to deal with fabricated “emergencies.” They’ll always ask you to wire the money — so that it can’t be traced.

Scammers have found creative ways of posing as customer service people who try not to arouse suspicion when they ask you for personal or financial information. Say you have a question for a major retailer but can’t find a phone number; you do a Web search, and several toll-free numbers appear. A closer look at the territory above and to the right of the search results reveals some look-alike names that belong not to your retailer but to a scam artist waiting for your call.

Do your friends and family a favor by sharing the FTC’s scam alerts with them. You can find them under the “education” tab on our blog: https://necontact.wordpress.com. Educating yourself and those close to you is the best single step you can take to fight fraud.

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer, ME 04412, visit https://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

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