Beware of phony subscription offers

CONSUMER FORUM

Posted Aug. 16, 2015, at 1:33 p.m.

Click image to read FTC tips

The Wall Street Journal’s website includes a caution to readers about new subscriptions and renewals. It notes that certain shady types pretend to represent the publication when their real purpose is simply to rip people off.

The open letter from Christina Komporlis, head of circulation service for Dow Jones & Company, says fraudulent offers came from companies called National Magazine Services, Orbital Publishing and Publishers Billing Exchange. She says none of those entities has any connection with The Wall Street Journal or Barron’s Magazine.

The website further cautions readers not to disclose personal or financial information — especially bank account or credit card data — to anyone from those companies. Komporlis writes she would appreciate having such fraudulent correspondence forwarded to her at reportsubscriptionfraud@dowjones.com.

The Wall Street Journal encourages people with questions to call, so I did. A nice customer service rep told me the publishers posted the notice to encourage caution among readers when renewing their subscriptions. He said consumers are urged to use credit cards, because people who have been scammed and sent checks to the scammers seldom get their money back.

The scam can work in a couple of ways. Crooks can offer a ridiculously low renewal rate, prompting consumers to think they’re getting a great deal — in fact, they’ll get nothing for this “bargain.” On the flip side, scammers may send a renewal notice including a rate that’s much higher than the real price.

Northeast CONTACT recently heard from a Maine consumer who unsuccessfully tried for a refund. She paid for two renewals only to find out the craft magazines had stopped publishing. A full year later, a website still was advertising that the defunct magazines could be ordered.

Words to the wise subscriber come from a variety of consumer advocates. The messages are all the same:

— Read solicitations carefully. If they ask you to send money to an address other than that listed in the magazine’s masthead — publication information inside — be wary. This is not always a deal-breaker, however. Some magazines use outside companies, so call your magazine directly — NOT the number on a mailing you suspect is a scam — to verify the collection firm.

— Look for misspellings. Scammers aren’t the best with grammar, either. Their errors can tip you off that an offer is not legitimate.

— Beware of higher prices and longer-than-normal subscription periods. Our chief caseworker is leery of any offer that’s longer than one year.

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer, ME 04412, visit https://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

 

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