Americans waste a ridiculous amount of food

CONSUMER FORUM

By Russ Van Arsdale, executive director Northeast CONTACT
Posted Aug. 29, 2016, at 11:31 a.m.

Click image to learn more at NRDC

The figures are more than troubling. With thousands of Mainers at risk of hunger every day and with so many resources used in the production of food, the amount that we waste is staggering.

By conservative estimates, 20 percent of all food we grow or buy is wasted. More pessimistic estimates put the figure at closer to 40 percent.

People who have looked into the issue say the figures don’t have to be even close to what they are.

In a white paper four years ago, the Natural Resources Defense Council said getting food from the farm to our tables:

— Uses 50 percent of U.S. land.
— Requires 10 percent of our energy budget.
— Consumes 80 percent of all freshwater consumed in the U.S.

The NRDC estimates that cutting food waste by 15 percent would help feed more than 25 million Americans every year. The Environmental Protection Agency says about 95 percent of the food we throw out goes to landfills or combustion facilities. In landfills, food breaks down to form methane gas.There’s more at the EPA website at epa.gov/recycle/reducing-wasted-food-home.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture also has guidance about the differences between “sell by,” “use by” and “expiration” dates. Visit fsis.usda.gov and search “food product dating.”

Last fall, USDA and EPA set a goal of cutting food waste in half by 2030. We’re always leery of benchmarks measured in decades, but this one seems to have a chance.

In 2013, the two agencies issued the U.S. Food Waste Challenge, helping people and groups find ways to reduce, recover and recycle food. By the end of 2014, the agencies said the challenge had more than 4,000 participants — well over its initial goal of reaching 1,000 participants by 2020.

College students are leading the charge through something called the Food Recovery Network. In a paper prepared for a symposium last spring, leaders of the five-year-old network wrote “we are challenging the status quo, making food recovery the norm and not the exception.”

We know this is an issue that resonates. People reacted strongly when Shaw’s Supermarkets stopped donating food to groups that work to feed hungry families. Shaw’s reversed field, at least partly at the urging of Rep. Chellie Pingree, D-Maine, who has introduced two bills to reduce food waste.

A provision in the Food Recovery Act passed the House in December. It creates an “enhanced” tax deduction for grocery stores, farmers and restaurants that donate excess food to soup kitchens, food banks and the like.

The Food Date Labeling Act would replace the current, often confusing system with two labels: one citing quality through a “best if used by” designation and one stating when a food will become unsafe (“expires on”).

Consumers can help by shopping in our refrigerators first and using up leftovers. We can make meal plans so that we buy just what we need, and buy in bulk only if we’ll use things while they’re still good. We can store things that will last and use up what won’t. We can donate excess produce from our gardens to agencies that help feed the hungry.

We can urge food-centered businesses to follow our lead. We can urge our elected leaders to work for effective changes and steer away from rules for rules’ sake. We can think about the nutritional value of food and maybe overlook a bruise or brown spot. We can do more.

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer, ME 04412, visit https://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

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