Archive for the ‘Consumer Product Safety Commission’ Category

Harbor Freight Tools Recalls Chainsaws Due to Serious Injury Hazard

Name of product:
Portland, One Stop Gardens, and Chicago Electric 14 inch electric chainsaws
Hazard:
The power switch can malfunction and allow the chainsaw to continue operating after the operator moves the switch to the “off” position, posing a serious injury hazard to the operator.

Remedy:
Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled chainsaws and return the product to their local Harbor Freight Tools store for a free replacement chainsaw. Replacement units will be available starting May 21, 2018.
Incidents/Injuries:
Harbor Freight Tools has received 15 reports of chainsaws continuing to operate after being turned off by the operator, resulting in three laceration injuries including one serious injury to the arm requiring stitches.
Sold At:
Harbor Freight Tools stores nationwide and online at http://www.harborfreight.com from May 2009 through February 2018 for about $50.
Importer(s):
Harbor Freight Tools, of Camarillo, Calif.
Manufactured In:
China
Recall number:
18-155
Consumer Contact:

Harbor Freight Tools at 800-444-3353 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PT, email at recall@harborfreight.com or online at www.harborfreight.com and click on “Recall Safety Information” on the bottom of the homepage for more information.

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Double Insight Recalls Multicookers Due to Fire Hazard; Sold Exclusively at Walmart

CPSC Recall

Gem 65 8-in-1 Multicooker sold at Walmart from August 2017 through January 2018 for about $80.

Remedy:

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled multicookers, unplug the unit and return it to Walmart to receive a free replacement.

Click image for more information

Incidents/Injuries:

Double Insight has received 107 reports of overheating, five resulting in minor property damage. No injuries have been reported.

Sold Exclusively At:

Walmart stores nationwide and online at http://www.walmart.com from August 2017 through January 2018 for about $80.

Manufacturer(s): Foshan Linshine Technology Co., Guangdong, China
Importer(s): Double Insight Inc., of Canada

Westinghouse Portable Generators Recalled by MWE Investments Due to Fire Hazard

Description:

This recall involves Westinghouse iGen2500 and iPro2500 portable inverter generators used to power appliances, cell phones or other electronic devices. The iGen2500 has a bright blue plastic cover and has “Westinghouse iGen2500” printed in white lettering on the side and on the front of the generator. The Westinghouse iPro2500 has a plastic gray cover. “Westinghouse iPro2500” is printed in white lettering on the side and front of the generator. The number of watts is also printed on the side. It reads 2200 Running Watts and 2500 Peak Watts. The generators measure about 20 inches long by 18 wide inches by 11 inches tall. They weigh about 49 pounds.

Remedy:

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled generators and contact MWE Investments to arrange for a free repair.

Incidents/Injuries:

The firm has received four reports of the recalled generators overheating and catching on fire. No injuries have been reported.

Sold Exclusively At:

Online at Amazon.com, apelectricgenerators.com, Climate Right.com, Homedepot.com, Houzz.com, Menards.com, PowerEquipmentDirect.com, and Walmart.com from June 2017 through October 2017 for between $580 and $600.

Source: Westinghouse Portable Generators Recalled by MWE Investments Due to Fire Hazard

Kidde Recalls Fire Extinguishers with Plastic Handles Due to Failure to Discharge and Nozzle Detachment: One Death Reported

Consumers should immediately contact Kidde to request a free replacement fire extinguisher and for instructions on returning the recalled unit, as it may not work properly in a fire emergency. Note: This recall includes fire extinguisher models that were previously recalled in March 2009 and February 2015. Kidde branded fire extinguishers included in these previously announced recalls should also be replaced. All affected model numbers are listed in the charts above. Recall information for fire extinguishers used in RVs and motor vehicles can be found on NHTSA’s website.

 

Source: Kidde Recalls Fire Extinguishers with Plastic Handles Due to Failure to Discharge and Nozzle Detachment: One Death Reported

Little Tikes Recalls Toddler Swings Due to Fall Hazard – CPSC

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled swings and contact Little Tikes for a refund in the form of a credit towards the purchase of another Little Tikes product.

Source: Little Tikes Recalls Toddler Swings Due to Fall Hazard

 

Units:
About 540,000
Description:

This recall involves Little Tikes 2-in-1 Snug’n Secure pink toddler swings. The swings have a pink T-shaped restraint in front with a Little Tikes logo. The swing is suspended by four yellow ropes.  The model number 615573 is molded on the back of the swing seat and there is a manufacturing date code stamp on the back of the seat. The molded INNER arrow of the date code stamp points to “10”, “11”, “12” or “13”, it is included in the recall.  In addition, swings with a date code stamp of “9” on the INNER arrow combined with “43” or higher number stamped on the OUTER are included in this recall. No other date codes or other colored swings are affected.

Incidents/Injuries:

The firm has received about 140 reports of the swing breaking, including 39 injuries to children including abrasions, bruises, cuts and bumps to the head. Two of the reported injuries included children with a broken arm.

Remedy:

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled swings and contact Little Tikes for a refund in the form of a credit towards the purchase of another Little Tikes product.

Sold At:

Walmart, Toys “R” Us and other stores nationwide and online at www.littletikes.com and other websites from November 2009 through May 2014 for about $25.

Manufacturer(s): Little Tikes, of Hudson, Ohio
Manufactured In:  U.S.

Deck the halls with vows of safety

CONSUMER FORUM

Posted Dec. 19, 2016, at 1:22 p.m.

The greatest gift that you could give this season might be yourself, safe and sound, arriving for a visit with a loved one or a friend.

Safety messages are everywhere this time of year. However, we all seem to be so busy that we may dismiss the cautions. Here are a few suggestions for consumers who want to keep themselves and those close to them safe:

—  Replace batteries and smoke/carbon monoxide detectors. Many of us replace batteries when we set clocks ahead in the spring and back in the fall. If you forgot, do it now. Smoke and CO detectors need good batteries to save lives. They also don’t last forever. If the date of manufacture on your smoke detector is more than 10 years old, it’s time to replace the unit. CO detectors are generally effective from five to seven years.

— Decorate safely. Spun glass known as “angel hair” can irritate eyes and skin. Wear gloves when you’re using it or use non-flammable cotton instead. Decorate with children in mind. Ornaments with metal hooks should go high on the tree. Use a good step ladder for hanging decorations.

— Clear your path. Keep wrapping paper, decorations and toys out of areas where you walk. The National Safety Council has tips about avoiding falls at nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/safety-at-home-falls.aspx.

— Keep pets safe. Holiday plants such as mistletoe and holly may attract household pets, and eating some plants can cause harm. Don’t feed table scraps to the dog or cat. Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian with the Food and Drug Administration, says rich, fatty foods can cause a potentially lethal condition called pancreatitis. And be careful of alcoholic beverages and chocolate around pets.

— Be aware of toy recalls. Check SaferProducts.gov for recall notices to avoid things such as lead paint, laceration risks or other hazards.

Officials in the insurance industry offer a number of tips, beginning with indoor tree safety. Avoiding open flame (candles) and frequent watering head the list.

Careful inspection of lights is another must. Allstate advises that holiday lights may contain PVC and may be tainted with lead. After you’ve decorated, wash up and keep children away from lights they might handle before sticking fingers in their mouths.

You can look for labels reading “RoHS” (Reduction of Hazardous Substances) meaning lead was not used in making the lights.

Outside your home, most safety precautions revolve around shopping. Make sure purchases are safe and out of sight when leaving them in your vehicle. Keep close watch on your wallet or purse, and be cautious of prying eyes when entering a PIN.

Back at home, be careful when cooking; the festive season can distract us and might increase the risk of a fire. Party responsibly. Celebrate safely, and make the season bright.

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer, ME 04412, visit https://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

Magnet maker wins court ruling despite injuries to children

Posted Dec. 05, 2016, at 1:45 p.m.

In 2012, the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a rule banning the sale of sets of small magnets. In November, the company that defied the agency won a federal appeals court victory; the firm’s website trumpeted, “Ban cleared. Game on.”

The Consumer Product Safety Commission’s action came after reports of injury to some children who swallowed the powerful neodymium (rare earth) magnet balls. If they ingested more than one, children were at risk of having the magnets attach and tear internal tissues or organs. Surgery sometimes was needed to remove the magnets.

Most distributors heeded the urgings of the group to stop selling the magnets, despite the warning labels stating that the toys were meant for adults and not children. One manufacturer — Zen Magnets of Boulder, Colorado — refused first the urgings and then orders to stop selling magnet sets. It did so with the backing of lots of consumers, who liked the variety of patterns they could form using the magnets.

The safety commission’s research in 2011 had found that some magnets sold in sets were 10 times more powerful than allowed in standards for children’s toys. Manufacturers insisted that the sets were for adults only, but the agency pointed to a rising number of emergency room visits involving children who had swallowed magnets.

A 2015 news release from the safety group blamed the death of a 19-month-old girl on magnet ingestion and estimated that 2,900 ER visits between 2009 and 2013 resulted from swallowed magnets. That news release focused on a federal judge’s order that Zen Magnets — at the time the only known seller of small magnet sets — to stop selling recalled magnets. The Justice Department had charged that Zen bought 917,000 magnets from another company, comingled them with other magnets and sold them after the other company issued a recall. Federal law bans the sale of recalled products.

In November of this year, a federal appeals court overturned the ban on magnet sales and sent the matter back to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Two of the three judges wrote that they found the safety group’s emergency room statistics did not show that the agency rule “is reasonably necessary to eliminate or reduce an unreasonable risk of injury.” Those judges wrote that they had “no opinion” on the number of injuries that would support issuing a new safety standard.

The minority judge on the panel wrote, “In my view, the record sufficed for the Commission’s finding of an unreasonable risk of injury.” A commission spokesperson told us “the hazard from these small, powerful magnets has not changed” if more than one is swallowed. The agency is “assessing its options and takes the matter very seriously.”

While the safety commission assesses its options, magnet sales abound on the internet. After doing his victory dance, the founder of Zen Magnets called for education over regulation. Shihan Qu wrote on his company’s website that swimming pools and toy balloons are more dangerous than his magnets and that education is the key to the safe enjoyment of most products.

They may not be toys, but that’s how magnet sets may appear to little eyes. Qu agreed with many critics when he wrote, “… high powered magnets should be kept away from any mouths and young children who don’t know better.”

In the same article Qu wrote, “Instead of driving Zen out of business, and pushing production further from the CPSC’s field of view, I’d rather use our resources to fight alongside the CPSC for successful educational and awareness campaigns focused on consumers and medical professionals.”

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer 04412, visit https://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

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