Posts Tagged ‘Superintendent Eric Cioppa’

State Officials Caution Maine Residents about Threats Posed by Severe Weather as Hurricane Season Approaches

PRESS RELEASE 

GARDINER – With the Atlantic Hurricane Season approaching, Governor Paul R. LePage and Insurance Superintendent Eric Cioppa are reminding Maine residents about steps that can be taken to protect people, minimize property loss and speed recovery after weather-related damage.  The Atlantic Hurricane Season begins June 1st and runs through November.

Governor LePage and Superintendent Cioppa encourage Mainers to review their homeowners or renters policy and to evaluate the benefits of flood insurance.  They also urge residents to complete a home inventory checklist and assemble an emergency supply kit.

“The start of the hurricane season is a good time to remember that severe weather can strike anytime and it’s important to be prepared,” Governor LePage said.  “There are simple steps we can all take to keep our families safe and property protected, and to recover quickly if damage occurs.”

Cioppa urged residents to understand what’s covered by their homeowners or renters policy and make sure coverage is adequate.  “Standard homeowner policies do not cover flooding, which is surprising to many people.  We should all take time to become familiar with our policy, purchase additional coverage if needed, consider whether flood insurance makes sense, and complete an inventory of possessions.”

Flood InsuranceFlooding is typically not covered by a standard homeowners policy.  Due to a 30-day waiting period for coverage to take effect, quick action is needed for a policy to be in place for much of this year’s hurricane season.  Details are available from the National Flood Insurance Program by calling 1-800-427-2419 or online at www.floodsmart.gov.  The website includes tools to help homeowners assess their flood risk.

Inventory Checklist:  A checklist can be enormously helpful in establishing an insurance claim.  Although a copy of the inventory can be kept at home, a second should always be maintained with insurance policies, medical records, and other important documents in a safety deposit box or other secure location.  The inventory should include photos and video of property.  A free checklist can be obtained on the Bureau’s website www.maine.gov/insurance (directly at www.maine.gov/pfr/insurance/consumer/individuals_families/homeowners_renters/home_inventory_checklist.html).

Additionally, the Governor and Superintendent encouraged residents to establish an emergency supply kit.  It should include several days of drinking water (at least one gallon per person per day), non-perishable packaged or canned foods, a non-electrical can opener and cooking utensil.  The kit should also contain first aid materials, necessary medications, basic tools, a battery or crank-operated radio and flashlights, extra batteries and any supplies needed for pets, as well as a list of important names and phone numbers, including insurance company contact information.

They also urged Mainers to familiarize themselves with resources provided by the Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) — available at www.maine.gov/mema/prepare/.

The Bureau of Insurance is part of the Department of Professional and Financial Regulation. Consumers can reach the Bureau at www.maine.gov/insurance; by calling 800-300-5000 in state; or by writing to Bureau of Insurance, 34 State House Station, Augusta ME  04333.

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Disaster Preparedness Tips for Homeowners and Renters from the NAIC

  • Take an inventory of your valuables and belongings. This should include taking photographs or a video of each room. This documentation will provide your insurance company with proof of your belongings and help to process claims more quickly in the event of disaster.
  • To enable filing claims more quickly, keep sales receipts and/or canceled checks. Also note the model and serial numbers of the items in your home inventory.
  • As you acquire more valuables — jewelry, family heirlooms, antiques, art —consider purchasing an additional “floater” or “rider” to your policy to cover these special items. These types of items typically are not covered by a basic homeowners or renter’s insurance policy.
  • Remember to include in your home inventory those items you rarely use (e.g., holiday decorations, sports equipment, tools, etc.).
  • Store copies of all your insurance policies in a safe location away from your home that is easily accessible in case of disaster. You may want to store your policies and inventory in a waterproof, fireproof box or in a safe, remote location such as a bank safe deposit box. Consider leaving a copy of your inventory with relatives, friends or your insurance provider and store digital pictures in your e-mail or on a Web site for easy retrieval.
  • Know what is and is not covered by your insurance policy. You might need additional protection depending on where you live. Make sure your policies are up to date. Contact your insurance provider annually to review and update your insurance policy.
  • Keep a readily available list of 24-hour contact information for each of your insurance providers.
  • Find out if your possessions are insured for the actual cash value or the replacement cost. Actual cash value is the amount it would take to repair or replace damage to your home or possessions after depreciation while replacement cost is the amount it would take to repair or replace your home or possessions without deducting for depreciation. Speak with your insurance provider to determine whether purchasing replacement coverage is worth the cost.
  • Speak with your insurance provider to find out if your policy covers additional living expenses for a temporary residence if you are unable to live in your home due to damage from a disaster.
  • Appraise your home periodically to make sure your insurance policy reflects home improvements or renovations. Contact your insurance provider to update your policy
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Maine Ranks Among Most Affordable States for Personal Auto and Homeowners Insurance

PRESS RELEASE – Bureau of Insurance, 2/10/2017

The State also has the nation’s second lowest percentage of uninsured drivers at 4.7%, and continues to have the lowest average homeowners premiums in New England

GARDINER –Insurance Superintendent Eric Cioppa announced that Maine continues to be among the top states in the nation for most affordable homeowners and personal auto insurance rates.

For the fourth year in a row, Maine ranks 3rd for lowest average auto insurance premiums, nationally, and for the third year in a row the state ranks 10th for lowest average homeowners premiums nationally, according to recently released reports by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). Maine continues to have the lowest average homeowners premiums in New England.

  • The NAIC’s Auto Insurance Database Report provides the average costs associated with personal automobile insurance and includes state-by-state auto insurance data and analysis for insurance regulators, consumers and lawmakers.  The types of auto insurance coverage included in the report are bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured and underinsured motorist, medical payment, collision, and comprehensive.
  • The NAIC’s Homeowners Insurance Report provides data on market distribution and average cost by policy form and amount of insurance.  Data is collected from insurance statistical agents or reported directly to the NAIC and includes national and state-specific premium and exposure information for homeowners policies, as well as non-commercial dwelling fire insurance policies.

“Despite having coverage requirements that exceed those in most other states, Maine continues to have consistently low average auto premiums,” Superintendent Cioppa said.  “And our State also remains among the most affordable for homeowner’s insurance.”

According to the Insurance Research Council, Maine also continues to have one of the lowest percentages of uninsured motorists, at 4.7%.

More information is available from the NAIC (www.naic.org).  Maine consumers and business owners with questions about auto, home, business or other lines of insurance are encouraged to contact the Bureau of Insurance by calling 1-800-300-5000 or sending a message to Insurance.PFR@maine.gov.

Officials Say Recent Storms Serve as Reminder about Actions Residents Should Take to Stay Safe and Protect Property During Severe Weather

PRESS RELEASE
Bureau of Insurance
July 18, 2014

GARDINER – Governor Paul R. LePage and Insurance Superintendent Eric Cioppa urged Maine residents on Friday to recognize that severe summer weather poses a threat to life and property, and they called recent strong storms a reminder that steps can be taken to save lives, minimize property losses and speed recovery.  Several Maine communities experienced heavy rains, power outages and flash flooding earlier this month.

Governor LePage and Superintendent Cioppa cited wind, flooding and fire as potential causes of major damage during summer.  They also noted that the Atlantic Hurricane Season runs through November.  The Governor and Superintendent encourage Mainers to review their homeowner or renter policy and to evaluate the benefits of flood insurance.  They also encourage residents to complete a home inventory checklist, and to assemble an emergency supply kit.

“The best time to prepare for severe weather is when the skies are clear and threats aren’t imminent,” Governor LePage said.  “As we’ve seen, strong storms can arrive quickly and cause significant problems.  We should all take simple steps to keep our families and property safe, and to be in a position to recover quickly should damage occur.”

Cioppa emphasized the importance of knowing what’s covered by a homeowners policy and making sure coverage is adequate.  “Many people are unaware that standard homeowner policies do not cover flooding.  They should review their policy, purchase additional coverage if needed, consider whether flood insurance makes sense for them, and complete an inventory of possessions.”

Flood Insurance:  Flooding is typically not covered by a standard homeowners policy.  Due to a 30-day waiting period for coverage to take effect, quick action is needed for a policy to be in place for later in this year’s hurricane season.  Details are available from the National Flood Insurance Program by calling 1-800-427-2419 or online at www.floodsmart.gov.  The website includes tools to help homeowners assess their flood risk.

Inventory Checklist:  Cioppa emphasized that the checklist can be enormously helpful in establishing an insurance claim.  Although a copy of the inventory can be kept at home, a second should always be maintained with insurance policies, medical records, and other important documents in a safety deposit box or other secure location.  The inventory should include photos and video of property.  A free checklist can be obtained on the Bureau’s website (www.maine.gov/insurance).

Additionally, the Governor and Superintendent encouraged residents to establish an emergency supply kit.  It should include several days of drinking water (at least one gallon per person per day), non-perishable packaged or canned foods, a non-electrical can opener and cooking utensil.  The kit should also contain first aid materials, necessary medications, basic tools, a battery or crank-operated radio and flashlights, extra batteries and any supplies needed for pets, as well as a list of important names and phone numbers, including insurance company contact information.  They also urged Mainers to familiarize themselves with resources provided by the Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) — available at www.maine.gov/mema/prepare/.

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Disaster Preparedness Tips for Homeowners and Renters from the NAIC

  • Take an inventory of your valuables and belongings. This should include taking photographs or a video of each room. This documentation will provide your insurance company with proof of your belongings and help to process claims more quickly in the event of disaster.
  • To enable filing claims more quickly, keep sales receipts and/or canceled checks. Also note the model and serial numbers of the items in your home inventory.
  • As you acquire more valuables — jewelry, family heirlooms, antiques, art —consider purchasing an additional “floater” or “rider” to your policy to cover these special items. These types of items typically are not covered by a basic homeowners or renter’s insurance policy.
  • Remember to include in your home inventory those items you rarely use (e.g., holiday decorations, sports equipment, tools, etc.).
  • Store copies of all your insurance policies in a safe location away from your home that is easily accessible in case of disaster. You may want to store your policies and inventory in a waterproof, fireproof box or in a safe, remote location such as a bank safe deposit box. Consider leaving a copy of your inventory with relatives, friends or your insurance provider and store digital pictures in your e-mail or on a Web site for easy retrieval.
  • Know what is and is not covered by your insurance policy. You might need additional protection depending on where you live. Make sure your policies are up to date. Contact your insurance provider annually to review and update your insurance policy.
  • Keep a readily available list of 24-hour contact information for each of your insurance providers.
  • Find out if your possessions are insured for the actual cash value or the replacement cost. Actual cash value is the amount it would take to repair or replace damage to your home or possessions after depreciation while replacement cost is the amount it would take to repair or replace your home or possessions without deducting for depreciation. Speak with your insurance provider to determine whether purchasing replacement coverage is worth the cost.
  • Speak with your insurance provider to find out if your policy covers additional living expenses for a temporary residence if you are unable to live in your home due to damage from a disaster.
  • Appraise your home periodically to make sure your insurance policy reflects home improvements or renovations. Contact your insurance provider to update your policy accordingly.

The Bureau of Insurance is part of the Department of Professional and Financial Regulation which encourages sound business practices through oversight of insurers, financial institutions, creditors, investment providers, and numerous professions and occupations for the purpose of protecting the citizens of Maine. Consumers can reach the Bureau at www.maine.gov/insurance; by calling 800-300-5000 in state; or by writing to Bureau of Insurance, 34 State House Station, Augusta ME  04333.

 

 

State Officials Announce Conclusion of Insurance Case and Return of More than $160,000 to Maine Consumer

Completed Case Highlights Importance of  Reporting Concerns and Utilizing Bureau’s Resources

GARDINER – Governor Paul R. LePage and Maine Insurance Superintendent Eric Cioppa announced that a complaint investigation resulting in the return of more than $160,000 to a Maine consumer has been completed. The investigation, conducted by the Bureau of Insurance’s Consumer Health Care Division, involved insurance agent Paul E. Richard and American Equity, the insurance carrier he represented.

“Maine is fortunate to have a large number of insurance agents, agencies and companies that provide important products and services with integrity and concern for their clients,” Governor LePage said.  “In those cases, however, when consumers or business owners are taken advantage of, the Bureau of Insurance is available to provide guidance and to take effective action whenever possible.”

The investigation and subsequent hearing found that Richard had recommended that a seriously ill man in the Lewiston area surrender his $100,000 life insurance policy, which he and his wife had paid premiums on for nearly 20 years. Richard recommended that the couple use the $11,935 cash value of the policy along with other assets, to purchase several annuities totaling $46,770, for which he received $4,775 in commissions.

After the death of her husband, which occurred just over a year later, the consumer filed a complaint with the Bureau. Following an enforcement action and hearing, Richard’s insurance producer license was revoked and he was ordered to pay a civil penalty of $12,500 to the State of Maine and restitution to the consumer equal to the full amount of the commissions and fees he received, plus interest. (A copy of the decision and order is available on the Bureau’s website at www.maine.gov/pfr/insurance/orders/08-305amended.htm.) The $12,500 civil penalty represented the maximum amount for each of the following ten violations:

Violation 1: $1500 for persuading someone with a disabling and degenerative condition to surrender his life insurance policy, in violation of 24-A M.R.S.A. §§ 1420‑K(1)(H), 2152, and 2155.

Violations 2–4: $1500 each for intentionally failing to disclose, on each of three annuity applications, that the new annuities were replacing existing policies

Violations 5–7: $1500 each for instructing the consumers to deposit the proceeds of the asset liquidations into the wife’s personal account and pay for each of three annuities by personal check, in order to conceal the source of funds.

Violations 8–10: $1500 with respect to the nonqualified annuity that replaced the life insurance policy, and $250 each with respect to the two qualified annuities, for selling annuities without conducting any meaningful inquiry into their suitability for the consumers, and without making a meaningful effort to ensure that the consumers understood what they were buying.

American Equity terminated the agent’s appointment with the company, following its own investigation, and paid the consumer the lost value of the $100,000 insurance policy, plus interest, and refunded the purchase price of all three annuities plus interest, without imposing surrender penalties. In addition, the company paid a $50,000 civil penalty to the State. (A copy of the consent agreement is available on the Bureau’s website www.maine.gov/pfr/insurance/consent_agreements/2010-2014/10202.htm).

Last month, the investigation was closed when, following a collections action initiated by the Attorney General’s Office against Richard, the final funds were paid and distributed.

“We are happy that this matter was brought to our attention and that we were able to assist in rectifying this situation for the consumer, who had suffered substantial financial loss as a result of this agent’s actions,” Superintendent Cioppa stated. “We encourage anyone with questions about life insurance, annuities or other insurance types, or anyone seeking information about insurance agents and brokers, to contact the Bureau by calling toll-free 1-800-300-5000 or e-mailing Insurance.PFR@maine.gov.”

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Maine to benefit from disability claims settlement

CONSUMER FORUM

By Russ Van Arsdale, Executive Director, Northeast CONTACT
Posted May 26, 2013, at 6:48 p.m.

Working Mainers whose disability insurance coverage is provided by one of three companies will likely be treated differently if they file claims in the future.

Maine’s Superintendent of Insurance, Eric Cioppa, announced last week that Maine is one of five states that settled a dispute with Life Insurance Company of North America (LINA), Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. and Cigna Health and Life Insurance Co. (formerly known as Alta Health and Life). In some cases, those companies will be taking a second look at claims they had previously denied.

Cioppa said Maine and the four other states (California, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania) all took close looks at the three Cigna companies and found that “they were not using available information to appropriately process disability income insurance claims.” While the companies admitted no wrongdoing by entering into the negotiated settlement, they did agree to change the way they decide whether to approve claims. (Some disability attorneys have alleged that the companies deny benefits without examining a claimant’s physical condition and that the companies use unauthorized video surveillance to show that claimants should be able to go back to work.)

As part of the multistate agreement, the companies are re-evaluating certain claims; they have set aside $48 million in case the reviews show that they need to pay additional benefits. The companies have also set aside an additional $29 million for claims that are open now.

During an interview, Cioppa was unable to estimate how much of that money might be coming to Mainers. He said denied claims from all five states will be sampled for review, and Cioppa said Maine will be “actively reaching out” to other states to become parties to the agreement.

Another part of the agreement requires the companies to pay Maine $175,000 in fines. The state will get an additional $100,000 to cover costs associated with examining cases.

There will be a 24-month monitoring period, during which the insurance departments of the five states will conduct random sampling of claims. They’ll be checking to see that the companies have improved the claims handling process for current policyholders. There will also be a remediation program, with the improved procedures applied to “certain previously denied or adversely terminated claims” for residents in participating states.

Following the monitoring period, Maine and other monitoring states will conduct what’s called a re-examination. That process is designed to measure the effectiveness of the companies’ improved claims review process and could take up to six months.

Eric Cioppa says the Bureau of Insurance is willing and able to help people who feel they may have been wronged in the past. “If they know they have some rights they may not have been aware of, they can always call us,” he added.

You can reach the Bureau at 1-800-300-5000 or online at www.maine.gov/pfr/insurance.

Consumer Forum is a collaboration of the Bangor Daily News and Northeast CONTACT, Maine’s all-volunteer, nonprofit consumer organization. For assistance with consumer-related issues, including consumer fraud and identity theft, or for information, write Consumer Forum, P.O. Box 486, Brewer 04412, visit https://necontact.wordpress.com or email contacexdir@live.com.

 

Maine Bureau of Insurance Obtains More Than $3 Million in Recoveries for Consumers in 2012

State Agency Handled Almost 9,000 Inquiries and Over 850 Complaint Cases

GARDINER – Superintendent Eric Cioppa announced on Friday that the Bureau of Insurance obtained more than $3 million for Maine insurance consumers in 2012. Nearly $2.2 million was recovered for consumers by the Bureau’s Consumer Health Care Division, and almost $950,000 was recovered for consumers by the Property and Casualty Division.

“The Bureau of Insurance takes its responsibility to assist Maine consumers, whether individuals or businesses, very seriously,” Superintendent Cioppa commented. “This can involve answering questions and providing information, or conducting investigations when a violation of Maine insurance law has been alleged.”

Cioppa noted that most insurers operating in Maine pay claims properly and quickly, but emphasized that when individuals or business owners contact the Bureau because of a dispute with an insurance company or agent, the agency can often provide assistance.

Cioppa said the Bureau fielded almost 9,000 inquiries and more than 900 complaints during 2012: the Property and Casualty Division handled 4,760 inquiries and 319 written complaints; and the Consumer Health Care Division received 3,958 inquiries and 543 written complaints.

Consumers with questions about insurance matters can obtain information and assistance from the Bureau by visiting the agency’s website (www.maine.gov/insurance), calling toll-free 1-800-300-5000, or e-mailing Insurance.PFR@maine.gov.

The Bureau of Insurance is part of the Department of Professional and Financial Regulation, which encourages sound ethical business practices through regulation of insurers, financial institutions, creditors, investment providers, and numerous professions and occupations for the purpose of protecting the citizens of Maine.

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